middle grade

Writing Tips

Magical Realism in Middle Grade


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Magical realism is a flourishing sub-genre of middle grade literature, but what does it mean, how is it different from standard fantasy and why is it so appealing to young readers and not-so-young authors alike? My first introduction to magical realism came in college when I became enamored with the works of Congolese author Sony Lab’ou Tansi; although, at the time, I wrote a paper outlining how his brand of magical storytelling differed from the classic magical realism tradition of Latin American authors like Gabriel García Márquez and Jorge Luis Borges. Nowadays, my thoughts on the subject are not quite so lofty.

Middle grade authors have developed their own version of magical realism, which, of course, varies just as much as previous iterations. Today I’m going to share my specific understanding of the sub-genre and how I have used everyday magic as a tool to develop my characters’ emotional journeys.

First, a definition. I like to define magical realism in middle grade as a story that takes place in an everyday setting with just a hint of magic. However, we need to take the definition a few steps farther to really understand magical realism, especially if we want to differentiate it from contemporary fantasy or urban fantasy, which are also fantasy stories that take place in everyday settings. One of the key differences here is that with contemporary or urban fantasy, the fantasy element is generally a force that characters must strive to overcome. Think Buffy the Vampire Slayer; the beasties are primarily there to drive the plot forward and give Buffy landmarks on her hero’s journey.

skeleton_tree_cvr_finalIn magical realism, the fantasy element serves a different purpose. It is generally there in order to spark or highlight an emotional change in the main character. Think of the magic as a spiritual guide, leading the character on a journey of self-discovery. The magical element is often symbolic of a larger idea. For a concrete example, let’s take a look at my first book, Skeleton Tree.

In Skeleton Tree, the main character, Stanly, discovers a finger bone in his backyard. He hopes to dig up the bones and photograph them in order to win a contest, but the bones have other ideas. They start to grow, first into a bony hand reaching up into the sky, and then into a full-sized skeleton that only children and a few special adults can see. The only person who doesn’t find the skeleton creepy is Stanly’s little sister, Miren. She wants to be best friends with the skeleton, that she names Princy, but when she starts to get sick more often than usual, Stanly worries that maybe the skeleton isn’t as friendly as Miren thinks.

Spoiler alert:  as you probably guessed, Princy represents Death in the story. As Stanly’s relationship with Princy changes and grows throughout the course of the book, so does Stanly’s understanding of Death. By the end, he realizes that, “maybe death [isn’t] all worms and nothingness. Maybe, sometimes, there [is] mystery and whimsy and dancing shadow puppets, too. The kind that [need] both light and dark to be seen” (154-155 Skeleton Tree). The magic serves the purpose of guiding both the character and the reader on an emotional journey that might be more difficult to conceptualize without a physical manifestation of a complex topic, in this case Princy as the physical manifestation of Death.

This is one of the reasons why I think magical realism works so well in middle grade. Not only can it give young readers a concrete way to visualize and understand fuzzy existential topics, but, using light magic, often with a big dose of whimsy, is also a great way to ease readers into a conversation about dark or difficult topics, like death in Skeleton Tree or homelessness in Katherine Applegate’s Crenshaw.

Another characteristic that differentiates magical realism from contemporary or urban fantasy is that authors of magical realism usually make no attempt to explain the magic. In Buffy the Vampire Slayer, for example, we learn an entire mythology surrounding slayers and demons that, while still fantastical, explains the world in a way that viewers and characters in the show are willing to accept. On the other hand, in magical realism, the author makes little or no attempt to explain, because it’s not about developing a larger fantasy world or a plausible system of magic, it’s about taking the character on a specific emotional journey. Once the journey is over, the magic often disappears or goes away until it is needed by a future character looking to undertake a similar emotional journey.

Hopefully this article has given you a greater understanding of magical realism in middle grade literature and has inspired you to go out and read, or even write, some magical middle grade in 2019.

Kim Ventrella is the author of the middle grade novels SKELETON TREE and BONE HOLLOW (coming 2/26/2019). Her short story, ‘Jingle Jangle,’ will appear in the NEW SCARY STORIES TO TELL IN THE DARK anthology releasing in 2020. Her works tackle tough topics with big doses of whimsy, hope and, of course, magic.

Book News

Skeleton Tree Final Copies


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My awesome editor, Mallory Kass, recently sent me some advance final copies of Skeleton Tree!!! They are so beautiful! The cover has a unique, pearlescent finish that I don’t think I’ve ever seen before. The artwork by Lisa Perrin is amazing, especially the skull butterfly on the back. If you take the dust cover off, you’ll find an imprinted butterfly, complete with tiny skulls on a seafoam green background with vibrant pink text.

And there’s a big surprise on the inside as well. Skeleton Tree has a hidden flip book!

Book Raves

Braced: Book Rave


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In her seventh grade year, Rachel Brooks plans to start on her school’s soccer team, hang with her best friends and maybe get a boyfriend. She doesn’t plan to wear a hard plastic back brace twenty-three hours a day that stretches from her shoulders to her hips.

Rachel nbracedeeds the brace to prevent the curve in her spine, caused by scoliosis, from getting worse. She understands how important it is, but that doesn’t alter the fact that the brace changes everything. Wearing clothes, playing soccer, even hanging with her friends become new and daunting challenges. To make matters worse, her mother doesn’t seem to understand why she’s having such a hard time adjusting to life in the brace.

Readers will ache as Rachel confronts cruelty at school, misunderstandings at home and disappointments on the soccer field. Author Alyson Gerber has crafted an honest, realistic, funny voice that will draw readers in and keep them rooting for Rachel till the very end. Particularly poignant are the complicated relationships that Gerber draws between Rachel and her mother and Rachel and her best friends.

An important book about finding inner strength even in difficult situations.

Book Raves

The Poet’s Dog: Book Rave


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Teddy, a dog, lives in a cabin in the woods with his best friend, Sylvan, a poet. Sylvan reads him stories every night, so many stories that he learns how to talk. But, although Teddy can talk, only special people can hear him, i.e. children and poets. Teddy is happy in his cabin with Sylvan, until one day Sylvan gets sick.

A quiet tale about the healing power of friendship, The Poet’s Dog manages to be poignant, heartbreaking and heroic all in under ninety pages. This is a perfect winter read, especially for me, since my life dream is to live in a cabin in the woods with my dog and write 🙂

Writer Interviews, Writing Tips

Extended Interview with Nanci Turner Steveson, Author of SWING SIDEWAYS


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This is an extended version of an interview also appearing on The Swanky Seventeens Debut Club.

Kim Ventrella (that’s me) recently got the chance to speak with fellow debut middle grade author, Nanci Turner Steveson, about her new novel, SWING SIDEWAYS, recently published by HarperCollins.COVER_SwingSideways_final-1

ABOUT THE NOVEL

SWING SIDEWAYS is a heartfelt middle grade debut in the tradition of BRIDGE TO TERABITHIA. Annie spends a magical summer exploring in the countryside with her new friend, California, in search of two missing ponies. But, when Annie discovers the truth behind California’s secrets, everything she’s learned about bravery, forgiveness, loss and love will be put to the test.

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Book Raves

The Imaginary: Book Rave


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Never lose your ability to see the extraordinary. That should be the tagline for A.F. Harrold‘s middle grade novel, The Imaginary (illustrated by the fabulous Emily Gravett).

Harrold tells the story of Rudger and Amanda. Amanda is a real girl with a powerful imagination. She dreams up an imaginary Friend named Rudger, and together they go on incredible adventures. True, Amanda bosses him around and sometimes hurts his feelings, but Rudger will always be her Friend, until… (more…)